A week of rain, survey and coring in Falefa, Samoa

Nick Porch examining a D-section core. Bugs in there will tell us about ancient ecosystems. Photo by Ron Lloren.

Our third week in the field was taken up with a variety of projects: working in the crater lakes to extract paleoenvironmental cores, continuing to map drainage ditches in Falevao and more D-section coring in Falevao. Plus we had several rain days.

We’ve now mapped an impressive network of ditches in Falevao and these mostly seem to connect to the river and likely served to channel water off the plantations during river flooding—we’ll do an elevational and hydrological analysis to test this idea.

Crossing the river to get to a coring site. Photo by Ron Lloren.

PhD student Ron Lloren from the Swiss ETF (Institute of Technology) is here to collect water samples for Hydrogen isotope analysis. The proportion of H isotopes in various water bodies can tell us about periods of aridity over millenia. We’ll correlate these data with our work on the field systems, flora, and insect fauna to generate as complete a picture of changing ecosystems as we can.

Ron takes rain water samples every day to get a baseline Hydrogen isotope signature.

Falefa survey area. The blue feature is a large walled walkway. The red features are single rock walls.

We’re now in our last week or so of fieldwork and back to Falefa mapping landscape features, including massive walled walkways that predate living memory and perhaps represent early divisions of the landscape. Excavations next year will help us determine this.

What one does on Sunday. Photo by Ron Lloren